R-CCC Alcohol & Drug Abuse Policy

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Roanoke-Chowan Community College

Ahoskie, North Carolina 27910

Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

Roanoke-Chowan Community College is committed to protecting the health and safety of employees, students, and the public by promoting a drug-free environment. This resource booklet provides an overview of the problems associated with drug and alcohol abuse, and resources available to the college community. Violations of this policy will be handled according to existing policies and procedures concerning the conduct of faculty, staff, and students. For further explanation of materials found in this booklet or additional assistance in the area of alcohol and drug abuse, contact the Dean of Student Services or Director of Human Resources at the College. Roanoke-Chowan Community College will conduct a biennial review of its Drug Prevention Program to determine its effectiveness and implement any changes.

 

Philosophy

Roanoke-Chowan Community College aspires to be the community college of choice for a diverse local, regional, and global community. The goals of the college are greatly enhanced in an environment free of drug and alcohol abuse. It is the responsibility of the college community-students; faculty and staff-to maintain and foster high standards of professional and personal behavior. The College’s efforts to establish and maintain a drug-free workplace will include providing ongoing drug awareness educational programs and dissemination of drug awareness information as well as implementation and strict enforcement of the drug-free workplace policy. The College’s Counseling Department and Human Resources Development Department will provide information and assistance to individuals with drug-related concerns and provide appropriate referrals for rehabilitation. Behavior that includes the illegal or abusive use of drugs and alcohol will not be tolerated by Roanoke-Chowan Community College. Any student, faculty or staff member who uses illegal drugs or alcohol on campus may be subject to prosecution and punishment by civil authorities and to disciplinary proceedings by the College. Student, faculty or staff who are abusing drugs or alcohol should stop. The College will not punish individuals who seek rehabilitation. All information provided by people who voluntarily avail themselves of drug or alcohol counseling or rehabilitation services will be confidential. It will not be used against the individual.

Roanoke-Chowan Community College Policy on Drug Abuse

Roanoke-Chowan Community College is committed to protecting the safety, health and well being of all employees and other individuals in our workplace. The College recognizes that alcohol abuse and drug use pose a significant threat to organizational goals. The College has established a drug-free workplace program that balances the respect for individuals with the need to maintain an alcohol and drug-free environment.

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of alcohol or a controlled substance is prohibited on the campus of Roanoke-Chowan Community College. When anyone is found on campus in violation of this policy, civil authorities will be notified immediately.

In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, employees must notify in writing the Director of Human Resources within five (5) calendar days of a conviction of any criminal drug statute violation which has occurred in or on the workplace premises.

The Policies of Roanoke-Chowan Community College authorize the administration to develop and maintain a drug abuse program, which includes alcohol, and make the program accessible to all students, faculty and staff of the College. The Drug-Free policy exists to maintain the safety and health of all employees and students as well as maintain the integrity and reputation of the College. The program is intended to accomplish the following:

  1. Prevent drug and alcohol abuse through educational programming; and
  2. Encourage and facilitate the use of counseling services and rehabilitation programs by those students, faculty and staff members of the College who require their assistance in stopping drug or alcohol abuse; and
  3. Protect organizational and personal assets from theft and destruction; and
  4. Discipline appropriately students, faculty and staff who engage in illegal drug and alcohol-related behaviors; and
  5. Comply with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 or any other applicable laws.

Any individual who conducts business for the organization, is applying for a position or is conducting business on the organization’s property is covered by our drug-free workplace policy. Our policy includes, but is not limited to full-time employees, part-time employees, off-site employees, volunteers, interns and applicants.

Applicability

The drug-free workplace policy is intended to apply whenever anyone is representing or conducting business for the organization. Therefore, this policy applies during all working hours, whenever conducting business or representing the organization, while on organization property and at company-sponsored events.

Educational Efforts to Prevent Drug Abuse

In keeping with the commitment of a drug-free environment for its students and employees, the College will provide information and educational programing aimed at preventing drug abuse and illegal drug use. Educational efforts will be directed toward all students, faculty and staff within our College community. The drug programs will emphasize the incompatibility of the use or sale of illegal drugs with the goals of Roanoke-Chowan Community College; the health risks associated with drug and alcohol abuse; the financial costs of drug and alcohol abuse; the incompatibility of drug abuse with the maximum achievement of educational, career, and other personal goals; and the potential legal consequences of involvement with illegal drugs.

Counseling and Rehabilitation Services to Prevent Drug Abuse

Those student, faculty, or staff who seek assistance with a drug related problem shall be provided with information about drug counseling and rehabilitation services available through Roanoke-Chowan Community College and also through community organizations. Those who voluntarily avail themselves of College services shall be assured that applicable professional standards of confidentiality will be observed. If, however, an individual violates the policy, the consequences are serious.

Disciplinary Actions to Prevent Drug Abuse

If an employee violates the policy, he or she will be subject to progressive disciplinary action and may be required to enter rehabilitation. An employee required to enter rehabilitation who fails to successfully complete it and/or repeatedly violates the policy will be terminated from employment. Nothing in this policy prohibits the employee from being disciplined or discharged for other violations and/or performance problems.

Return-to-Work Agreements

Following a violation of the drug-free workplace policy, an employee may be offered an opportunity to participate in rehabilitation. In such cases, the employee must sign and abide by the terms set forth in a Return-to-Work Agreement as a condition of continued employment.

Assistance

Roanoke-Chowan Community College recognizes that alcohol and drug abuse and addiction are treatable illnesses. We also realize that early intervention and support improve the success of rehabilitation. To support our employees, our drug-free workplace policy:

  • Encourages employees to seek help if they are concerned that they or their family members may have a drug and/or alcohol problem.
  • Encourages employees to utilize the services of qualified professionals in the community to assess the seriousness of suspected drug or alcohol problems and identify appropriate sources of help.
  • Allows the use of accrued paid leave while seeking treatment for alcohol and other drug problems.

Treatment for alcoholism and/or other drug use disorders may be covered by an employee’s benefit plan. However, the ultimate financial responsibility for recommended treatment belongs to the employee.

Confidentiality

All information received by the College through the drug-free workplace program is confidential. Access to this information is limited to those who have a legitimate need to know in compliance with relevant laws and management policies.

Shared Responsibility

A safe and productive drug-free workplace is achieved through cooperation and shared responsibility. Both employees and management have important roles to play.

All employees are required to not report to work or be subject to duty while their ability to perform job duties is impaired due to on- or off-duty use of alcohol or other drugs. In addition, employees are encouraged to report dangerous behavior to their supervisor. It is the supervisor’s responsibility to inform employees of the drug-free workplace policy and investigate reports of dangerous practices.

Communication

Communicating our drug-free workplace policy to both supervisors and employees is critical to our success. To ensure all employees are aware of their role in supporting our drug-free workplace program:

  • All employees will receive a written copy of the policy.
  • The policy will be reviewed in orientation sessions with new employees.
  • Employee education about the dangers of alcohol and drug use and the availability of help will be provided to all employees.

It is not “double jeopardy” for both the civil authorities and the College to proceed against and punish a person for the same specified conduct. The College will initiate its own disciplinary proceedings against a student, faculty or staff member when the alleged conduct is deemed to affect the interests of the College. Penalties will be imposed by the College in accordance with procedural safeguards applicable to disciplinary action against students, faculty and staff, as required by the Bylaws and Policies of Roanoke-Chowan Community College and Student Handbook of the College.

 

For Your Information

  1. If any person commits a controlled substance violation in which the punishment includes imprisonment for not more than two (2) years and if he/she has been previously convicted for one or more controlled substances violations, he/she shall be punished as a Class I Felon. Up to five (5) years in prison and/or fine.
  2. If the violation includes imprisonment for not more than six (6) months in prison and if he/she has been previously convicted of one or more controlled substances violations he/she shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment of not more than two (2) years and/or maximum fine of $2,000.
  3. Any person 18 years of age or older who sells or delivers any controlled substance to a person under 16 years of age shall be punished as a Class E felon. Up to thirty (30) years in prison and/or fine.

 

Financial Cost of Alcohol and Drug Abuse

 

Drug abuse in a college setting can result in increased costs to students, the college employee and the college itself. These increased financial costs result from the following situations.

Alcohol and Drug Cost

Alcohol and drug abuse places a tremendous financial burden on individuals and their families. As the abuse continues, the financial burden becomes greater since the individuals demand for more drugs and alcohol increases and their productivity or their work decreases. As the burden increases to the point where the individuals can no longer support their abuse problems, they often turn to crime to solve their financial problems.

Accidents

The physical and psychological effects of drug abuse make a person more prone to accidents due to impaired physical capacity and reasoning ability. Accidents result in lost class time and work time, repair costs for damaged equipment or facilities, increased health insurance costs, increased production costs, and loss of revenues from decreases production or loss of clients.

Class Absenteeism

Class absenteeism is a leading factor in student academic failure. Academic failure has immediate financial costs since it effects one’s productivity throughout life. The costs of employee absenteeism result from hiring additional personnel to perform the absentee’s tasks, lost production, or services and overtime costs.

Performance Problems

The psychological and physiological effects of drug abuse on a person can cause impaired performance which results in low academic achievement by students, loss of production or services, loss of clients or customer, faulty products or services, damage to equipment a facilities, and waste of raw materials or time.

Common Drugs

 

  1. MARIJUANA. Made from dried leaves and flowering tops of a pistillate hemp plant that yields cannabin. This mixture is frequently smoked in cigarettes for its intoxication effect.
  2. COCAINE. A bitter crystalline alkaloid obtained from cocoa leaves. This drug can result in psychological dependence and, in large doses, intoxication. This drug is also used as a local anesthetic.
  3. CRACK. An unrefined form of Cocaine that is even more habit forming and powerful than cocaine. A quicker acting drug than Cocaine-more dangerous to the individual taking it.
  4. HEROIN. A narcotic which lowers the perception of pain. Made from Morphine but more potent than Morphine-a strongly physiologically addictive narcotic. Causes lethargy, apathy, loss of judgment and self-control. Overdose can cause convulsions, coma, and death. Other risks include malnutrition, infection, and hepatitis.
  5. PCP (Angel Dust). Phencyclidine (PCP) is a hallucinogenic drug that is legally classified as a depressant. Depression, hallucinations, confusion, and irrational behavior may occur from use. Overdoses can cause convulsions, coma, and death.
  6. PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. The “illegal” use and abuse of ‘legal’ (prescription) drugs such as amphetamines (‘uppers’), barbiturates (‘downers’), valium, Librium, methaqualone, morphine, and codeine can cause life threatening situations and health problems. Risks include dependency, heart problems, malnutrition, hepatitis, infections, coma, convulsions, and death.
  7. OTHERS. Some other commonly abused substances are alcohol, nicotine, and inhalants such as aerosol products, lighter fluid, paint thinner, glues, and amyl nitrite (‘poppers’). Some of the risks involved in the abuse of these substances are cancer, heart and liver damage, emphysema, lung cancer, and damage to the lungs, brain, and bone marrow.

 

Campus Resources

Wendy Vann, Dean

Student Development Services

Roanoke –Chowan Community College

Student Services Suite, New Student Center

252-862-1234

 

Local and State Resources

 

Hertford County Mental Health Center

Substance Abuse Education Services

2109 N. Queen Street

Kinston, NC 28501

Contact: (919) 527-2658

Hertford County Health Department

704 N. King Street

Winton, NC 27896

Contact: (252) 358-7830

Will provide information on AIDS prevention.

City of Ahoskie Police Department

Contact: (252) 332-5011

Crime prevention office will provide information and guest speaker on alcohol and drug abuse, including local and state legal sanctions.

 

Hertford County Sheriff’s Department

Contact: (252) 358-7800

Crime prevention office will provide information and guest speaker on alcohol and drug abuse, including local and state legal sanctions.

 

East Carolina Behavioral Health

Contact: (877) 685-2415

Access to mental health, substance abuse, developmental and disability services.

 

Ahoskie Chamber of Commerce

Drug Coalition

Contact: (252) 332-2042

Task force established to increase awareness of substance abuse problems in the workplace.

 

Port Human Services

144 Community College Road

Ahoskie, NC 27910

Contact: (252) 332-4598

Provides consultation, technical assistance and health education relative to drug and alcohol concerns. Speakers available on request.

 

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

Contact: (919) 523-1616

Local chapter of the national MADD association. Involved in legislation to toughen drunk driving penalties, red ribbon campaign, candlelight vigils and advocacy and awareness.

 

Alcohol/Drug Council of North Carolina

P.O. Box 25111

Durham, NC 27702

Contact: Tony Mulvihill, Director, (919) 688-7058

The Alcohol/Drug Council of North Carolina, formerly United Health Services, is the North Carolina state affiliate of the National Council on Alcoholism. A/DCNC has established a computerized statewide information and referral service and increased efforts to educate the public that alcohol and other drug abuse is treatable, preventable and a family problem. They are also involved in planning, providing technical assistance, advocacy, training, and publishing information. This information is available without charge.

 

National Resources

Alateen, Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.

P.O. Box 862, Midtown Station

New York, NY 10018-0862

Contact: (212) 302-7240 or (800) 356-9996

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

P.O. Box 459

Grand Central Station

New York, NY 10163

Contact: (212) 686-1100

American College Health Association

15879 Crabbs Branch Way

Rockville, MD 20855

Contact: (301) 963-1100

 

Association of Labor-Management Administrators and Consultants on Alcoholism, Inc. (ALMACA)

1800 North Kent Street, Suite 907

Arlington, VA 22209

Contact: (703) 522-6272

 

California Urban Indian Health Council, Inc.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

2422 Arden Way, Suite A-32

Sacramento, CA 95825

Contact: (916) 920-0313

 

Children of Alcoholics Foundation, Inc.

P.O. Box 4185, Department N.A.

Grand Central Station

New York, NY 10163

Contact: (212) 2351-2680

 

Institute on Black Chemical Abuse

2614 Nicollet Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55408

Contact: (612) 871-7878

 

National Association of Children of Alcoholics (NACoA)

31582 Coast Highway, Suite B

South Laguna, CA 92677

Contact: (714) 499-3889

 

National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics (NANACoA)

P.O. Box 3364

Seattle, WA 98114

Contact: (206) 324-9360

 

The National Black Alcoholism Council, Inc.

417 South Dearborn Street, Suite 100

Chicago, IL 60605

Contact: (312) 663-5780

 

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)

P.O. Box 2345

Rockville, MD 20852

Contact: (301) 468-2600

 

National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse (NCPCA)

National Council on Alcoholism (NCA)

12 West 21st Street

New York, NY 10010

Contact: (212) 206-6770 or (800) NCA-CALL

 

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

5600 Fishers Lane, Room 11055, Parklawn Building

Rockville, MD 20857

Contact: (301) 443-1148

 

Journals and Newsletters on Alcohol and Other Drug Issues

CONTACT THE FOLLOWING FOR MORE INFORMATION:

 

Advances in Alcohol and Substance Abuse

Haworth Press, Inc.

28 East 22nd Street

New York, NY 10010

 

Alcoholism Report

Manisses Communications Group, Inc.

P.O. Box 3357

Wayland Square

Providence, RI 02906-0357

 

Contemporary Drug Problems

Federal Legal Publications

157 Chambers Street

New York, NY 10007

 

Drug Abuse Report

Manisses Communications Group, Inc.

P.O. Box 3357

Wayland Square

Providence, RI 02906-0357

 

Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education

Michigan Interfaith Council on Alcohol Problems

1120 E. Oakland

P.O. Box 10212

Lansing, MI 48901

 

Journal of Primary Prevention

Human Services Press

72 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10011

 

Journal of Studies on Alcohol

Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University

P.O. Box 969

Piscataway, NJ 08854

 

Prevention Pipeline

NCADI

Department PP

P.O. Box 2345

Rockville, MD 20852

 

U.S. Journal of Drug and Alcohol Dependence: The National Trade Publication for Professionals

1721 Blount Road, Suite 1

Pompano Beach, FL 33069

 

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

SELF-HELP SERVICES

Alcoholics Anonymous

This is an informal international fellowship of people who join because they cannot control their use of alcohol. They meet and talk about their alcohol problems. Meetings are held throughout the Hertford County area.

Contact: 877-685-2415

 

Narcotics Anonymous

Group therapy for addicts who want to remain drug free. Similar to AA. Meetings held in Greenville area.

Contact: (252) 830-0513

 

LOCAL TREATMENT SERVICES

 

Roanoke-Chowan Human Services Center

Alcohol and drug rehabilitation services; emergency services nights and weekends

Contact: 252-332-5709

 

Hertford County Health Department

704 N. King Street

Winton, NC 27896

Contact: (252) 358-7830

Will provide information on AIDS prevention.

 

Port Human Services

144 Community College Road

Ahoskie, NC 27910

Alcohol and drug addiction treatment

Contact: 252-332-5086

 

TREATMENT FACILITIES

 

Alcohol/Drug Outpatient Treatment

Mountain Alcohol Treatment Center

146 Victoria Road

Asheville, NC 28801

This freestanding facility offers intervention, adolescent services, and family services. ACoA/CoA and employee assistance programs.

Contact: Dorothy Roberson, Director, (704) 255-8655

 

Brynn Marr

192 Village Drive

Jacksonville, NC 28540

Available for men and women. Among services provided are detoxification, intervention, adolescent and family services, AcoA, CoA and employee assistance programs.

Contact: Cindy C. Ferrell, (919) 577-1400

 

CareUnit Hospital Program

Alamance County Hospital

327 North Graham-Hopedale Road

Burlington, NC 272153

Alcohol and drug addiction treatment. Twelve-step recovery program. State licensed and JCAH accredited.

 

CareUnit Hospital Program

Rowan Memorial Hospital, Inc.

612 Mocksville Avenue

Salisbury, NC 28144

Alcohol and drug addiction treatment program. Detoxification and intervention available.

Contact: (704) 638-1300

 

Carolina Manor

1100 Pine Run Drive

Lumberton, NC 28358

Contact: Beverly Wesley, Director, (800) 445-7595

 

CHAPS/Koala Center

5010 South Alston Avenue

Durham, NC 27713

The Koala network offers a comprehensive selection of treatment programs tailored to specific needs. Day or evening outpatient treatment programs for adults, adolescents, families and women can focus on individual counseling, co-dependency, relapse treatment and continuing care. Admissions are available twenty-four hors a day, year round.

Contact: Nancy A. Rains or Ann Hoff Wilson, (919)781-2440 or (800) 522-2427

 

Charlotte Treatment Center (Amethyst)

1715 Sharon Road West

Charlotte, NC 28224

Detoxification, family services and ACoA/CoA available. Treatment models include 12-step recovery, disease/medical and psycho/social models.

Contact: John Jamison, (704) 554-8873

 

Charter Hospital of Greensboro

700 Walter Reed Drive

Greensboro, NC 27403

Both a hospital and freestanding facilities available for adolescent, family and ACoA/CoA services. State licensed and JCAH accredited.

Contact: Lynn Thacker, Intake Supervisor, (919)852-4821

 

Charter Hospital of Winston-Salem

Genesis Recovery Center

3637 Old Vineyard Road

Winston-Salem, NC 27106

Freestanding facility which offers detoxification and family services to men and women with alcohol or drug addictions and dual diagnoses.

Contact: Laura Beach, (919) 768-7710

 

Charter Northridge Hospital

400 Newton Road

Raleigh, NC 27615

Charter Northridge is psychiatric hospital specializing in treatment of chemical dependency problems for adults and adolescents. Charter counseling centers are located in Rocky Mount and Cary, and offer a full range of mental health counseling.

Contact: (800) 447-1800

 

Charter Pines Hospital

3621 Randolph Road

Charlotte, NC 28211

Focus is on dual diagnosis. Adolescent and family services available. State licensed and JCAH accreditation.

Contact: Barret Whitener, (704) 365-5368

 

Comprehensive Treatment for Chemical Dependency

#5-A Doctors Park

Greenville, NC 27834

Program is designed to address both chemically dependent persons and their family members. Through assessment and evaluation, an individualized recovery program is prescribed based on identified client needs.

Contact: Sandra Thomas, MS-CSAC, (919) 752-0113

 

 

 

CPC Cedar Spring Hospital

Pineville-Matthews Road

Pineville, NC 28134

Comprehensive services available for drug and alcohol addictions.

Contact: Pam McKenna, (704) 541-6676

 

Cumberland Addiction Center

Cumberland Hospital

3425 Melrose Road

Fayetteville, NC 28304

Hospital and freestanding facilities available to women with drug and alcohol addictions. Services include detoxification, intervention and adolescent and family programs.

Contact: Robert A. Blackburn, M.D., (919) 485-7181

 

Duke Alcoholism and Addictions Program

Durham, NC 27713

Confidential diagnosis and treatment of the many aspects of addiction.

Contact: (919) 684-3850

 

Fellowship Hall, Inc.

P.O. Box 13890

Greensboro, NC 27415

A freestanding facility for the treatment of alcohol and drug addiction disorders.

Contact: Connye Post, (919) 621-3381

 

The Hope Center

Cary, NC

Outpatient treatment of adults, adolescents, spouses and parents for alcohol and drug addiction in group or private sessions.

Contact: (919) 481-4673

 

Highland Hospital at Hopewell

P.O. Box 1101

Asheville, NC 28802

Treats alcohol and drug addictions and dual diagnoses. Detoxification, adolescent and family services are available. This facility is state licensed and accredited through JCAH.

Contact: Richard D. Selman, M.D., Director, or Pete Banyai, Adolescent Substance Abuse Program, (704) 254-3201

 

The Life Center of Fayetteville

Cumberland Hospital Campus

3425 Melrose Road

Fayetteville, NC 28304

Intervention, detoxification and adolescent services available in this freestanding facility.

Contact: Robert A. Blackburn, M.D., (919) 485-7181

 

 

Mary Frances Center

1212 Recovery Road, Box D

Tarboro, NC 27886

Inpatient treatment program available to adults and adolescents. Treatment is followed with a two year after-care program. Codependency and family treatment is also available in a separate program and facility on the Mary Frances Center grounds.

 

Oakleigh at Durham

309 Crutchfield Street

Durham, NC 27704

Chemical dependency treatment center with twenty-four hour admissions and inpatient and outpatient programs centered around individual needs.

Contact: Earlie O. Jones, (919) 479-3000 or (800) 782-1113

 

Open House Counseling Service

Jonnie H. McLeod Treatment Center

145 Remount Road

Charlotte, NC 28203

Alcohol and drug addiction disorders are treated through the 12-step recovery program at this state licensed freestanding facility.

Contact: Pamela S. Francis, (704) 332-9001

 

Pinehurst Treatment Center, Moore Regional Hospital

P.O. Box 3000, Page Road

Pinehurst, NC

Treatment for persons with alcoholism, drug dependency, cocaine dependency and their families.
Aftercare, detoxification, intervention and adolescent services are available.

Contact: Bill Sitnik, (919) 295-7902

 

Pitt County Mental Health Center, Detoxification Facility

Stantonsburg Road

Greenville, NC 27834

The Detoxification Facility services substance abusers, alcoholics or drug users who need care for detoxification. Voluntary and involuntary clients are accepted. Ability to pay is not a consideration for admission. For admission, the client must have a degree of addiction sufficient to warrant residential care. Also, the client’s physical and/or behavioral status must be stabilized prior to admission.

Contact: Theresa D. Edmondson, (919) 752-7151

 

The Randolph Clinic, Inc.

100 Billingsley Road

Charlotte, NC 28211

Adolescent services, family services and ACoA/CoA available through the 12-step recovery program and psycho/social models.

Contact: Henry T. Finch, Jr., (704) 376-2431

 

 

Specialized Hearing Impaired Program

Moose Lake Regional Treatment Center

1000 Lakeshore Drive

Moose Lake, MN 55767

SHIP is a unique program specifically designed to provide service to hearing impaired persons who have drug and alcohol problems. This program offers treatment services for people with a wide range of hearing loss, from moderate hard of hearing to profound deafness. This fifteen-bed, self-contained unit is available on a nationwide basis for men or women who are sixteen years of age and older.

Contact: (218) 485-4411

 

St. Joseph’s Hospital Addictions Recovery Program

428 Biltmore Avenue, 5 East

Asheville, NC 28801

Disorders treated include alcohol and drug addiction as well as dual diagnoses. Services available are detoxification, intervention, family services and ACoA/CoA.

Contact: Maurice Schade, (704) 255-3300

 

Straight

Pembroke Six, Suite 129

Pembroke Office Park

Virginia Beach, VA 23462

Straight, Inc. is a family oriented treatment program for adolescents and their families based on a philosophy of self help which means kids helping kids, parents helping parents, and families helping families under the supervision of trained professionals. The main objectives of treatment are the revitalization of the family while enabling the young person to recapture a productive, meaningful and drug-free life.

Contact: Andy Reading, (804) 499-9111

 

Walter B. Jones Alcoholic Rehabilitation Center

Highway 33 West

Greenville, NC 27834

ARC provides a 28-day intensive inpatient rehabilitation program for alcohol and drug abusers. Programs include assessment, orientation treatment, planning, group therapy, classes/meetings of Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous, NCAARD module series, leisure counseling, vocational rehabilitation, medical assessment and stabilization and discharge planning.

Contact: Kim Bell, (919) 830-3426

 

Wilmington Treatment Center

2520 Troy Drive

Wilmington, NC

A residential program for alcoholism and drug dependency treatment, based on the twelve step program, for males and females aged twelve and over. The Center provides comprehensive individual and group therapy programs as well as medically supervised subacute detoxification.

Contact: (919) 762-2727

 

Woodhill (Division of Appalachian Hall)

P.O. Box 5534

Caledonia Road

Asheville, NC 28813

Treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. Services available include transportation, EAP, ACoA/CoA, family services, adolescent services, intervention and detoxification.

Contact: Dennis F. Moore, Pharm.D. (704) 253-3681

 

Toll-Free Hotlines

 

LOCAL EMERGENCY NUMBERS:

Hertford County Area………………………………………………………………………. 252-358-7800

Hertford County Area……………………………………………………………………………………… 911

Ahoskie Area…………………………………………………………………………………… 252-332-5011

 

TOLL-FREE HOTLINES:

AIDS Hotline (U.S. Public Health Service)……………………………………… 1-800-342-2437

Alateen, Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters………………………………… 1-800-356-9996

American Social Health Association………………………………………………. 1-800-227-8922

Child Abuse (Parents Anonymous)…………………………………………………. 1-800-421-0353

Childfind…………………………………………………………. 1-800-231-6946 or 1-800-621-4000

Cocaine Abuse (National Cocaine Hotline)……………………………………. 1-800-COCAINE

Covenant House……………………………………………………………………………. 1-800-999-9999

Drug Abuse (National Institute on Drug Abuse)………………………………. 1-800-638-2045

Drug Intervention Services of America…………………………………………… 1-800-752-6432

Duke Poison Control Center…………………………………………………………… 1-800-672-1697

Gay-Lesbian Hotline (Nat’l Gay/Lesbian Crisis Line)………………………. 1-800-221-7044

Hazelton………………………………………………………………………………………. 1-800-328-9000

Health Information (US Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev.)…………………. 1-800-336-4797

Heartlife………………………………………………………………………………………. 1-800-241-6993

Information Center for Individuals with Disabilities………………………… 1-800-462-5015

Mental Disability (Amer. Assoc. on Mental Deficiency)………………….. 1-800-424-3688

National Association for Hearing and Speech Action……………………….. 1-800-638-8453

National Council on Alcoholism………………………………………………… 1-800-NCA-CALL

National Federation of Parents for Drug-Free Youth………………………… 1-800-554-5437

National Spinal Cord Injury Association…………………………………………. 1-800-926-9629

Organ Donor Information (The Living Bank)…………………………………… 1-800-528-2971

Roche Laboratories……………………………………………………………………….. 1-800-682-1957

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Foundation…………………………………….. 1-800-221-7437

Talking Books (Library of Congress)……………………………………………… 1-800-424-9100

Veneral Disease Hotline………………………………………………………………… 1-800-227-8922

Women’s Community Health Center………………………………………………. 1-800-327-9880

 

IN NORTH CAROLINA:

Careline (Statewide Information and Referral Hotline)…………………….. 1-800-662-7030

Carolina Manor…………………………………………………………………………….. 1-800-455-7595

CHAPS/Koala Center (Treatment Center)……………………………………….. 1-800-522-2427

Charter Northridge Hospital…………………………………………………………… 1-800-447-1800

Governor’s Hotline……………………………………………………………………….. 1-800-642-0841

Mary Frances Center (Treatment Center)………………………………………. 1-800-999-4TLC

Oakleigh at Durham……………………………………………………………………… 1-800-782-1113

Perspectives (Kinston)………………………………………………………………….. 1-800-637-1056

Woodhill Treatment Center…………………………………………………………… 1-800-438-4871